Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread.

Paralysis is loss of muscle function for one or more muscles. Paralysis can be accompanied by a loss of feeling (sensory loss) in the affected area if there is sensory damage as well as motor.

Paralysis is the inability of a muscle or group of muscles to move voluntarily. Muscles are controlled by messages sent from the brain that trigger movement. When part of the brain is damaged after a stroke, messaging between the brain and muscles may not work properly. Paralysis is usually on the side of the body opposite the side of the brain damaged by stroke, and may affect any part of the body. You may experience one-sided paralysis, known as hemiplegia, or one-sided weakness, known as hemiparesis. Locked-in syndrome is an example of severe paralysis that leaves the stroke survivor unable to move any muscles except those that control the eyes. Post-stroke paralysis symptoms may include but are not limited to: Hemiparesis Spasticity/stiff muscles Dysphagia: trouble swallowing Hemiplegia Foot drop Weakness Incoordination Sensory deficits Balance problems

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